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The Relationship Between HIV Antibody Titer, HIV Viral Load, HIV p24 Antigen, and CD4 T-cell Count Among Iranian HIV-positive Patients

Author(s):

Majedeh Moradbeigi, SeyedAhmad SeyedAlinaghi, Mansour sajadipour, Omid Dadras, Esfandiar Shojaei, Parisa Ahmadi, Saeed Bayanolhagh, Kazem Baesi* and Mehrnaz Rasoolinejad   Pages 1 - 6 ( 6 )

Abstract:


Objective: This study aimed to simultaneously measure and assess in-between correlations of available parameters including HIV-1 p24 Ag and antibody levels, CD4 cell count, and viral load in different stages (A, B, and C) of HIV disease among HIV-positive individuals in Iran.

Materials and methods: Fifty-two HIV-positive individuals were divided into three groups according to the HIV disease stages classification, available in Control of Disease and Prevention (CDC) guideline. A 10 ml of venous blood sample was collected to run the tests for HIV-1 antibody and p24 Ag levels, CD4 cell counts, and viral load.

Results: The correlation coefficients between p24 Ag and CD4 cell count in stages A, B and C were, respectively, 0.03, 0.4 and -0.1 (p >0.05). We also found no correlation between the viral load and p24 antigen in stages A, B and C (0.06, -0.07 and -0.22, respectively) (p >0.05). the coefficient was also insignificant for in-between correlation of other measured parameters.

Conclusion: The association of anti-HIV antibodies with HIV disease progression in infected individuals was independent of HIV-1 RNA levels. However, combined measurement of HIV-1 RNA and CD4 cell counts should be routinely carried out in HIV infected patients follow up.

Keywords:

P24 Ag, HIV viral load, CD4 count, HIV antibody, correlation

Affiliation:

Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iranian Research Center for HIV/AIDS, Iranian Institute for Reduction of High-Risk Behaviors, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iranian Research Center for HIV/AIDS, Iranian Institute for Reduction of High-Risk Behaviors, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Department of Global Health and Socioepidemiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Iranian Research Center for HIV/AIDS, Iranian Institute for Reduction of High-Risk Behaviors, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Khajenasir Toosi University of Technology,Chemistry Faculty, Iranian Research Center for HIV/AIDS, Iranian Institute for Reduction of High-Risk Behaviors, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Hepatitis and AIDS Department, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran, Iranian Research Center for HIV/AIDS, Iranian Institute for Reduction of High-Risk Behaviors, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran



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