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Determinants of Needle Stick Injuries Among Healthcare Providers at a Tehran University Hospital in 2016: A Descriptive Report

Author(s):

Seedreza Jamali Moghadam, Seyed Ahmad Seyed Alinaghi, Omid Dadras*, Zoha Ali, Seyed Yousef Mojtahedi, Susan M. Senko and Fariba Amini   Pages 1 - 5 ( 5 )

Abstract:


Background: Needle Stick Injuries (NSIs) are the most common occupational injuries among HCWs. The aim of this study was to explore the causes of such injuries at a university hospital in Tehran, Iran, in 2016.

Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study in Ziaeian Hospital. The medical records of 55 Health Care Workers (HCWs) who experienced NSIs in 2016, were extracted from the hospital registry. The data were analyzed using SPSS version 22.

Results: Available data of 55 HCWs with a history of NSIs in the hospital registry, included in this study. All the HCWs were trained and familiarized with the safety and risk control measures after needle stick exposures in the hospital. The highest number of NSIs belonged to registered nurses (34.6%), licensed practical nurses (14.5%) and medical doctors (12.7%), respectively. The majority of the NSIs occurred in the morning shift (50.9%) followed by night shift (36.4%) and evening shift (12.7%). Most of the NSIs occurred in the emergency department (38.1%) and operating room (18.2%). The healthcare workers reported fatigue as the most common reason for being injured by needles (67.4%).

Conclusion: The present study identified the causes of such injuries among HCWs in a university hospital. The results of this study could be used to address the shortcoming in the guidelines and protocols necessary to modify and implement sustainable safety measures that could reduce the occurrence of the NSIs in hospitals in Iran.

Keywords:

Needle stick, Health care workers, Prevalence, Cause

Affiliation:

Department of Infectious Diseases, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iranian Research Center for HIV/AIDS, Iranian Institute for Reduction of High Risk Behaviors, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Department of Global Health and Socioepidemiology, Kyoto University, Department of Infectious Diseases, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Department of Bahrami Children Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Department of School of Nursing, George Mason University, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Ziaeian Hospital



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